500px

For anyone enjoying my photography, I’m maintaining my favorite photos on 500px.

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Private Photo Vault: Not So Private

One of the most popular App Store applications, Private Photo Vault (Ultimate Photo+Video Manager) claims over 3 million users, and that your photos are “100% private”. The application, however, stores its data files without using any additional protection or encryption than any other files stored on the iPhone. With access to an unlocked device, a pair record from a seized desktop machine, or possibly even just a copy of a desktop or iCloud backup, all of the user’s stored images and video can be recovered and read in cleartext.

Screen Shot 2014-09-29 at 9.08.33 PM

 

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Counter-Forensics: Pair-Lock Your Device with Apple’s Configurator

Last updated for iOS 8 on September 28, 2014

As it turns out, the same mechanism that provided iOS 7 with a potential back door can also be used to help secure your iOS 7 or 8 devices should it ever fall into the wrong hands. This article is a brief how-to on using Apple’s Configurator utility to lock your device down so that no other devices can pair with it, even if you leave your device unlocked, or are compelled into unlocking it yourself with a passcode or a fingerprint. By pair-locking your device, you’re effectively disabling every logical forensics tool on the market by preventing it from talking to your iOS device, at least without first being able to undo this lock with pairing records from your desktop machine. This is a great technique for protecting your device from nosy coworkers, or cops in some states that have started grabbing your call history at traffic stops.

With iOS 8’s new encryption changes, Apple will no longer service law enforcement warrants, meaning these forensics techniques are one of just a few reliable ways to dump forensic data from your device (which often contains deleted records and much more than you see on the screen). Whatever the reason, pair locking will likely leave the person dumbfounded as to why their program doesn’t work, and you can easily just play dumb while trying not to snicker. This is an important step if you are a journalists, diplomat, security researcher, or other type of individual that may be targeted by a hostile foreign government. It also helps protect you legally, so that you don’t have to be put in contempt of court for refusing to turn over your PIN. The best thing about this technique is, unlike my previous technique using pairlock, this one doesn’t require jailbreaking your phone. You can do it right now with that shiny new device.

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How to Help Secure Your iPhone From Government Intrusions

There’s been a lot of confusion about Apple’s recent statements in protecting iOS 8 data, supposedly stifling law enforcement’s ability to do their job. FBI boss James Comey has publicly criticized Apple, and essentially blamed them for the next hundred children who get kidnapped. While Apple’s new security improvements have made it a lot harder to get to certain types of data, it’s important to note that there are still a number of techniques that can be employed against iOS 8, with varying levels of success. Most of these are techniques that law enforcement is already doing. Some are part of commercial forensics tools such as Oxygen and Cellebrite. The FBI is undoubtedly aware of them. I’ll outline some of the most common ones here.

I’ve included some tips for those of us who are concerned about data security. Security researchers, journalists, law abiding activists, diplomats, and many other types of high profile individuals should all be practicing good data security, especially when abroad. Foreign governments are just as capable of performing the same forensics techniques that our own government is capable of, and there is an overwhelming amount of information suggesting that all of these classes of individuals have been targeted by foreign governments.

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Shellshock OpenSSH restricted shell RCE/PE Proof of Concept

Synopsis:

The sshd daemon used in OpenSSH supports a ForceCommand directive, allowing shell logins to be restricted to specific commands. This is often used in configuring sshd for cvs/git accounts, restricted shells, or management scripts. The ForceCommand directive can be employed system wide, or just for specific users.

Vulnerability:

By default, sshd is configured to allow the LANG environment variable to be pass through prior to execution of the restricted shell. On systems vulnerable to the bash/shellshock vulnerability, LANG can be set in such a way that spawns a remote shell or executes other code on the server, effectively bypassing the forced command and allowing full account access. This can be taken advantage of after the user has authenticated via ssh, and so such systems are only at risk from abuse by their own authorized users, however such users are normally restricted from being able to execute arbitrary commands, and so this is more of a privilege escalation in such cases. This vulnerability can be even more dangerous on systems with open restricted accounts, in which case it becomes an RCE risk.

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The Politics Behind iPhone Encryption and the FBI

Apple’s new policy about law enforcement is ruffling some feathers with FBI, and has been a point of debate among the rest of us. It has become such because it’s been viewed as just that – a policy – rather than what it really is, which is a design change. With iOS 8, Apple has finally brought their operating system up to what most experts would consider “acceptable security”. My tone here suggests that I’m saying all prior versions of iOS had substandard security – that’s exactly what I’m saying. I’ve been hacking on the phone since they first came out in 2007. Since the iPhone first came out, Apple’s data security has had a dismal track record. Even as recent as iOS 7, Apple’s file system left almost all user data inadequately encrypted (or protected), and often riddled with holes – or even services that dished up your data to anyone who knew how to ask. Today, what you see happening with iOS 8 is a major improvement in security, by employing proper encryption to protect data at rest. Encryption, unlike people, knows no politics. It knows no policy. It doesn’t care if you’re law enforcement, or a criminal. Encryption, when implemented properly, is indiscriminate about who it’s protecting your data from. It just protects it. That is key to security.

Up until iOS 8, Apple’s encryption didn’t adequately protect users because it wasn’t designed properly (in my expert opinion). Apple relied, instead, on the operating system to protect user data, and that allowed law enforcement to force Apple to dump what amounted to almost all of the user data from any device – because it was technically feasible, and there was nobody to stop them from doing it. From iOS 7 and back, the user data stored on the iPhone was not encrypted with a key that was derived from the user’s passcode. Instead, it was protected with a key derived from the device’s hardware… which is as good as having no key at all. Once you booted up any device running iOS 7 or older, much of that user data could be immediately decrypted in memory, allowing Apple to dump it and provide a tidy disk image to the police. Incidentally, it also allowed a number of hackers (including criminals) to read it.

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iOS 8 Protection Mode Bug: Some User Files At Risk of Exposure

Apple’s recent security announcement suggested that they no longer have the ability to dump your content from iOS 8 devices:

“On devices running iOS 8, your personal data such as photos, messages (including attachments), email, contacts, call history, iTunes content, notes, and reminders is placed under the protection of your passcode. Unlike our competitors, Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data. So it’s not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8.”

It looks like there are some glitches in this new encryption scheme, however, and some of the files being stored on your iOS 8 device are not getting encrypted in this way. If you copy files over to your device using iTunes’ “File Sharing” feature or sync videos that appear in the “Home Videos” section of iOS, these files are not getting placed under the protection of your passcode. Theoretically, Apple could dump these in Cupertino, if given your locked iPhone.

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Ballistic Has Been Acquired

To my fantastic Ballistic customers,

It’s been an incredible six years watching Ballistic grow from a humble trajectory computer to top the charts as the App Store’s most popular field firing system. Ballistic has grown organically – a rarity in this industry – through word of mouth, and nothing more. Not a single penny was ever spent on advertising to grow Ballistic, and yet it’s been featured in the NRA’s rifleman magazine, reviewed in a number of online magazines and blogs, and is now used by many world class competition shoots, military, and police sharpshooters. It has become a trusted name in the industry, and for that I am deeply grateful to all of you who have told your friends about it, and helped support the product with great ideas and requests.

Many of you have been asking me when an Android version is coming, or when other platforms will be supported, or new hardware that’s just now coming out, and are eager to see Ballistic continue to grow in capabilities. There are a lot of great new things that can be done with Ballistic, and I think there’s much more in store. I can’t do all of this alone, though, and so I’ve been in talks over the past few months with a team who has the resources to take the Ballistic suite of products to the next level.

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Your iOS 8 Data is Not Beyond Law Enforcement’s Reach… Yet.

In a recent announcement, Apple stated that they no longer unlock iOS (8) devices for law enforcement.

On devices running iOS 8, your personal data such as photos, messages (including attachments), email, contacts, call history, iTunes content, notes, and reminders is placed under the protection of your passcode. Unlike our competitors, Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data. So it’s not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8.”

This is a significantly pro-privacy (and courageous) posture Apple is taking with their devices, and while about seven years late, is more than welcome. In fact, I am very impressed with Apple’s latest efforts to beef up security all around, including iOS 8 and iCloud’s new 2FA. I believe Tim Cook to be genuine in his commitment to user privacy; perhaps I’m one of the few who can see just how gutsy this move with iOS 8 is.

It’s important to take a minute, however, to note that this does not mean that the police can’t get to your data. What Apple has done here is create for themselves plausible deniability in what they will do for law enforcement. If we take this statement at face value, what has likely happened in iOS 8 is that photos, messages, and other sensitive data, which was previously only encrypted with hardware-based keys, is now being encrypted with keys derived from a PIN or passcode. No doubt this does improve security for everyone, by marrying encryption to the PIN (something they ought to have been doing all along). While it’s technically possible to brute force a PIN code, that doesn’t mean it’s technically feasible, and thus lets Apple off the hook in terms of legal obligation. Add a complex passcode into the mix, and it gets even uglier, having to choose any of a number of dictionary style attacks to get into your encrypted data. By redesigning the file system in this fashion (if this is the case), Apple has afforded themselves the ability to say, “the phone’s data is encrypted with a PIN or passphrase, and so we’re not legally required to hack it for you guys, so go pound sand”. I am quite impressed, Mr. Cook! That took courage… but it does not mean that your data is beyond law enforcement’s reach.

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An Open Letter to Tim Cook and Apple’s Security Team

Greetings!

You may not know me, but you probably know my research over the years. I’ve been researching security on Apple devices since 2007, when iPhone first came out, and even helped put together the very first jailbreaks. I’ve assisted law enforcement and military with forensics tools and support on iDevices, and had already started helping to make our world a much better place before Apple even had a law enforcement process. Additionally, I’ve written several books on iPhone ranging from development, to security, to forensics. Throughout my time researching Apple, I’ve found many vulnerabilities that affect the privacy of your customers (including me!), and have presented findings at numerous security and forensics conferences, including Black Hat, Hackers on Planet Earth (HOPE), Mobile Forensics World, Techno Security, HTCIA, and others. Never asked you to feature my books in your store (even when mine were the only iPhone books), never asked for free products, invites to anything, or felt entitled to anything. I love Apple products, and that’s why it’s been a fun experience to tinker with them, and it feels good to know that I’ve played a small, but consistent role in seeing their security improve over time.

You know what’s not fun? When I work very hard on a research paper, go to the trouble of submitting it to a scientific journal, and pay out of my own pocket to travel to a conference to present my findings only to have Apple silently sweep the vulnerabilities I’ve discovered under the rug without ever disclosing their existence, the patches you’ve made, or giving the researcher proper credit in your security release notes. Today, you released your security notes for iOS 8, and guess what wasn’t in them? Almost all of the things you fixed in Beta 5, that came directly from my research paper. Shortly after my research made national news, Apple fixed a number of these serious vulnerabilities that – at best – were the product of horribly sloppy engineering. Not small issues, either, mind you – issues that allowed for persistent, wireless surveillance of iOS devices, wirelessly intercepting packet data, and bypassing the consumer’s backup encryption password to scrape highly sensitive consumer data (including SMS, photo album, geolocation database, and more) from the device using a number of undisclosed services Apple had never told the public even existed and were running on all 600 million consumer devices, in spite of the fact that numerous commercial law enforcement forensics tools were actively exploiting these services to dump highly sensitive content from consumers’ mobile devices.

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Is Apple’s new 2FA Really Secure? (Answer: It’s Pretty Solid)

I’ve recently updated my TL;DR regarding the recent celebrity iCloud hacks. I now summarize Apple’s latest changes to improve their 2-factor authentication (2FA) . Apple has implemented not just a band-aid, but a very good security solution to protect iCloud accounts, by completely reinventing their own 2-step validation (sorry, I couldn’t resist). As a result, users who have activated this feature will need to provide a one-time validation code in order to access their iCloud account from a web browser, or to provision iCloud from an iOS device. As my TL;DR suggests, this new technical measure would have prevented the celebrity iCloud hacks. So are Apple’s new techniques really secure, even in light of the very technically un-savvy users who fall victim to iCloud phishing attacks?

While Apple has done their part to improve the security of iCloud, less than savvy users can still screw it up. First of all, by not having the feature turned on in the first place. Apple’s two-step validation process is opt-in, and therefore it’s important to make sure that users know about and understand the benefits to enabling this feature. In my opinion, Apple should force users to have this feature on if they enable Photo Stream or iCloud Backups, as they are likely to keep sensitive content in the cloud without necessarily knowing it.

So you’re more savvy than that. You’ve already activated the new 2FA on your iCloud account. Are you truly safe from future phishing attacks?

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