Day: February 19, 2015

Lenovo Enabled Wiretapping of Your Computer

Robert Graham recently uncovered software that came preinstalled on Lenovo computers hiding under the guide of advertising-ware. While the media rushes to understand the technical details behind this, many are making the mistake of chocking it up to some poorly designed advertising / malvertising software with vulnerabilities. This is not the case at all, and it’s important to note that what’s been done here by Lenovo and SuperFish by all accounts is far more serious: a very intentionally designed eavesdropping / surveillance mechanism that allows Lenovo PCs’ encrypted traffic to be wiretapped anywhere it travels on the Internet. We’ll never know the true motives behind the software, but someone went to great lengths to maliciously transform encrypted traffic in a way that allows this electronic wiretapping, then bundled it with new Lenovo computers.

Based on Graham’s notes, and what the media is reporting is commonly referred to as a Man-in-the-Middle attack on the victim’s computer; this is only where the trouble begins. When the user goes to establish an encrypted connection with, say, Bank of America, the SuperFish software pretends that it’s Bank of America right on your computer, by using a phony certificate to masquerade as if it were actually the bank. SuperFish then talks to the real Bank of America using its own private keys to decrypt traffic coming back to it. Where this becomes dangerous is that this transforms the traffic while it’s in transit across the Internet, so that data coming back to the PC is encrypted with a key that SuperFish can decrypt and read.

The threat here goes far beyond that of just the victim’s computer or advertisements: by design, this allows for wiretapping of the PC’s traffic from anywhere it travels on the Internet. In addition to the local MiTM / advertising concerns the media is focusing on, it appears as though the way SuperFish designed their software allows anyone who has either licensed or stolen SuperFish’s private key to intercept and read any encrypted traffic from any affected Lenovo PC across the Internet, without ever having access to the computer. How is this possible? Because SuperFish appears to use the same private keys on every reported installation of the software, according to what Graham’s observed so far.

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