Evangelical Christianity has Become Alien to me

All have turned aside, they have together become corrupt; there is no one who does good, not even one.

Psalm 14:2-3

I’ve devoted much of the past 30 years as an evangelical Christian “layperson” to Christian studies to try and become an educated one. Greek, theology, patristic authors, and Christian history should be in the wheelhouse of every Christian. Even still, what Christianity has become in America is entirely alien to me and what I’ve studied. I don’t recognize the church in the midst of the racism, hostility, and lies that Christians proliferate today. I’m frankly ashamed and embarrassed to have to share the label. Last year brought some of the worst out in us. I’m referring to the mainstream evangelical church – relatives, friends, and people I’ve grown up with – who were once a much-needed example of Christianity to me – have severely disappointed in how they’ve conducted themselves, causing me to question if they ever truly understood their own faith.

Every Christian’s example par excellence – Jesus – was abundantly clear in having nothing to do with the wicked. He literally turned tables on those whose agenda didn’t align with his. Scripture is chock full of warnings about the dangers of aligning with wicked people, or compromising one’s values to an end. Christianity teaches of a savior who demonstrated sheer disinterest in politics, from “Render unto Caesar” to his markedly uninterested appearance before an irrelevant Pontius Pilate. Christians wielded no political clout until the third century, yet today are obsessed with power – even to the degree of aligning with white nationalists who condone hate and murder, or expressing blind, cult-like loyalty to demagogues. We have become enablers of hate, violence, racism, and division through our alliances, our funding, and trafficking in misinformation to convince ourselves it’s moral. The church sacrificed her reputation for the kind of influence and power that Jesus would yawn at.

Yet Christianity celebrates a meek savior who saw intrinsic value in people regardless of their race, their past, or their status. He called for the lifting up of those who were downcast and mistreated by society. He called for sacrificial love of the disenfranchised. To reflect compassion. Generosity. Selflessness. He thought mankind was valuable enough to sacrifice for. Christianity should be, by definition, a mirror image of Christ’s sacrificial love for humanity, and an example of integrity and truth, even to one’s own detriment. I don’t see the character of Jesus Christ in today’s American Christians. Christians couldn’t even bother wearing a mask for their brother.

In retrospect, this has been a long time coming. It is of little surprise that Christians support racist leaders, as the church has become the most segregated institution in the country. White Christians have spent generations basking in the privilege of not having to think or preach about racism and inequality, while black and brown Christians in churches down the road are haunted by it daily. The ability to remain blissfully ignorant of racism has been the darling sin of every white suburban Christian church since history was first tormented to create a white Jesus. And is it any surprise that Christians have become extreme anti-science in the wake of infectious disease? The church’s historical inability to grasp our own God as chief architect with any tools other than magic has caused otherwise intelligent people to become modern-day imbeciles – even in the broad daylight of mass graves and outdoor crematoriums resembling hell on Earth. 

Christians, we are called to be innocent of evil, not to align ourselves with it. How can we support the immorality of those we elect to govern us, or crowd fund for murderers and white supremacists when it so clearly has borne the fruit of evil? As Christians and human beings, this should grieve us, not excite us. This manufactured reality doesn’t represent the God that I worship, study, and aspire to be more like. 

Our actions are not without accountability in the next life, I fear, much to the pains of those who don’t care who they align themselves with, who they infect, or what atrocities they help fund. God knows every hair we’ve harmed through our indifference. The famous words Jesus uttered, “I stand at the door and knock” in Revelation was directed at the church, who often left their own savior out in the cold. Church, who has bewitched you?